Installation guide 2018-01-30T13:40:24+00:00

OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE PRODUCING PLASTIC EXTRUSIONS

Installation Guide

Studrail horse fence is easy to put up when handled correctly.
Please bear in mind that despite its ease of installation you are constructing a robust high tensile fence that
needs to be suitable for horses and ponies.

Construct Strong Bracing and Strainers

To hold the high tensile wire within Studrail taught the start and end of each run be sure to construct a strong end brace or strainer.
We recommend using a New Zealand Brace or diagonal strut system either of which will provide the solid support needed to make your fence strong and secure. Details on how how to construct

Studrail tip: We recommend post spacings between 6ft and 10ft.
(The best results are achieved with close post spacings). We do not recommend straining more than 100 metres per run.

Plan For Your Studrail Fence

Make a plan for your horse fence before you start work. Good fences can be formal or informal in appearance, yet all need to be well built and
carefully planned. Many experienced horse owners can tell you stories about the planned savings from cheaper, but unsafe, horse fence (barbed wire, for example) eventually being paid out in vets bills to treat injured horses.

The best planning involves a layout drawn to scale that shows proposed gates, fence lines and where fences might need
to cross a ditch or other obstacles. plan in routes for supplies and water, vehicle access, and mowing equipment.

Setting Your Fence Posts

Intermediate posts can be spaced at 6-10ft intervals. The Studrail should be erected along the centre line of the straining posts with intermediate offset.

Studrail Tip: The best results are achieved with close post spacings

Attaching The Studrail

Roll out the Studrail on the fixing side, cut back at one end sufficient plastic to expose the wire.
Pass through pre-drilled holes in the straining post and tighten ratchets securing one end.

Fixing Horse Fence To The Posts

Hang up the Studrail at suitable intervals by tacking brackets on. Make sure that the Studrail is not twisted.

Tighten the ratchets at the other end and finally fix by hammering down the brackets with nails or screwing tightly on
all the intermediate posts to ensure a good, straight rail.

Making Joints

To save waste, Studrail can be joined by the use of links. Cut back the plastic leaving a tongue and simply slide on.

Studrail tip: We sell the links needed to join rolls together remember to add them to your order

How To Brace High Tension Horse Fences

Studrail is a high tension horse fence that has the traditional look and visual appeal of wooden post and rail but the strength and flexibility of high tensile wire.

The key to an effective tension fence is high-tensile wire that is able to withstand constant fence tension, as well as tension increases due to animal impact or even cold-weather contraction. It is worth noting that all high-tension fences are constructed of high-tensile wire but not all fences made of high-tensile wire are going to be high-tension fences.

Tensile and Tension

“High-tensile” refers to the wire’s strength. “High tension” refers to its tautness—great enough so that the wires can’t be easily pushed apart and in the event of an impact they will snap back to the original position. Studrail uses Tinsley “Sentinel” which is a high tensile 2.50mm galvanized fencing wire to B.S.4102:1990

Bracing

The high-tensile wire inside the Studrail is strung between key posts that form the fence’s foundation.
These are the anchor or brace posts located at each end of a fencing run.  These anchor posts must be braced so they can resist the strong pressure which is exerted by the tensioned wire. Don’t forget that this tension will be multiplied by the number of wires in the fence.

Two Forms of Studrail Bracing

These are two methods that will provide good support for your Studrail horsefence. If they are well constructed they will keep your fence strong (and looking good) for many years to come.

The New Zealand Brace

Steel pins should be inserted to hold the crossbar.
Use plain fencing wire to tension and tighten with a stick.

Tensile and Tension

“High-tensile” refers to the wire’s strength. “High tension” refers to its tautness—great enough so that the wires can’t be easily pushed apart and in the event of an impact they will snap back to the original position. Studrail uses a high tensile 2.50mm galvanized fencing wire to B.S.4102:1990

An oak tree came down and flattened a studrail fence.
The tree was cleared away, new posts put in and the Studrail was retightened.

A car went crashed into  the fence of a Studrail customer.
The Studrail didn’t break, they put in a few new posts and retightened.

A customer who originally bought from us in 1984 is now reporting that their posts have rotted away.
They are however replacing the posts and reusing their Studrail.

Please get in touch we would be delighted to hear from you.

Peter Perks Ltd.
47 Gatwick Road,
Crawley,
West Sussex,
RH10 9RD

Call +44 (0)1293 427200
Email info@peterperksltd.com